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Local high schools collecting safe driving pledges

Local high schools collecting safe driving pledges

Two local high schools are competing in a nation-wide campaign for the chance to win $100,000 grant and a private concert by Grammy nominated The Band Perry.

This is the third year “Celebrate My Drive” has been hosted by State Farm Insurance, designed to lower the rate of fatal car crashes for teens 14-18 and unite teens, parents, school officials and community members around teen driver safety in a positive and celebratory way.

Celebrate My Drive asks everyone 14 and older to make a safe driving commitment in support of their favorite school by visiting CelebrateMyDrive.com from October 15-24. The 100 schools to generate the most commitments will win a prize.

Locally you can dedicate your safe driving commitment to either Gonzaga Prep or East Valley High.

Hoedown for HOPE fundraiser this weekend

Hoedown for HOPE fundraiser this weekend

Get your cowboy boots out and prepare to boogie at this weekend's Hoedown For HOPE, a fundraiser for children with hearing loss.

The event begins Saturday, October 4th at 5 pm at Riverside Place, 1108 W. Riverside, Spokane.

During the evening you will enjoy live music and dancing to Spokane's own rockabilly band “Sharecroppers,” dinner and dessert by London's Ultimate Catering, and fabulous items offered through raffles, live auction and prize packages. Tickets are only $55.

Last year more than 200 local and statewide professionals from the medical, educational and business communities attended, raising over $45,000 to support local deaf and hard of hearing children to listen and talk. The success of this event enables HOPE School to continue providing specialized services to all children with hearing loss, regardless of their families ability to pay full tuition, and also provides an opportunity to increase awareness of the effects of hearing loss and the benefits of accessing early intervention services.

Controversy continues over proposed WSU medical school

Controversy continues over proposed WSU medical school

 The University of Washington released a scathing rebuttal this week to a report supporting the creation of a medical school for Washington State University, saying it contains “a number of deep flaws,” and is based on “faulty assumptions, omissions and erroneous data.”

WSU first approached consultant MGT of America in February to conduct a feasibility assessment for a new medical school based on the University's health sciences campus in Spokane. Specifically the assessment was to focus on the need for physicians in Eastern Washington, the best educational model to meet those needs, if current WSU resources were capable of creating a program to meet accreditation standards and the required time and resources to develop a new medical school.

Eastern students participate in day of service

Eastern students participate in day of service

More than 250 incoming Eastern Washington University students are joining staff and faculty for a day of service next Tuesday, September 23.

Projects vary from supporting local Cheney and Spokane Parks to assisting seniors at Volunteer Chore Services and Cheney Care Center to providing assistance at the EWU and Vinegar Flats community gardens. These students will join the thousands of Eastern students who invest their time and talents in serving local and regional communities each year.

According to Molly Ayers, director of Eastern's Office of Community Engagement, EWU is committed to developing opportunities for students that are transformative and cultivate “professionally, socially and culturally engaged leaders, citizens and communities.”

“The university recognizes the importance of engaging with our local communities and values the opportunities community engagement provides for students, faculty, staff and graduates as well as the communities we serve,” Ayers said.

Fire safety reminder for dormitory living

Fire safety reminder for dormitory living

Dorms are filling up fast around Washington State as students begin or continue their college education, and the state Fire Marshal wants to make sure everyone has a safe school year.

“Fire safety should be reviewed as students settle into their new places,” said State Fire Marshal Chuck Duffy. “Understanding the safety features of a building and knowing your escape routes can significantly increase your personal safety.”

The United States Fire Administration reports an estimated 3,800 university housing fires occur each year. The leading causes include cooking, intentionally set fires, careless smoking, unattended candles and overloaded electrical wiring. Marshal Duffy suggests the following tips to reduce the risk of fire and increase safety:

Cooking should only be done in a location permitted by the school’s policies. Never leave your cooking unattended. If a fire starts in a microwave, leave the door closed and unplug the unit.

Check your child's vaccinations before heading back to school

Check your child's vaccinations before heading back to school

Getting ready for back to school means getting school supplies and backpacks, but it's also the perfect time to make sure children are up-to-date on their shots. Getting all of the recommended shots is one of the most important things parents can do to protect their kids' health.

A new survey from the Washington State Department of Health shows vaccination rates are on the rise (71 percent in 2013 versus 65 percent the year before) but are still below the Healthy People 2020 goal of 80 percent, leaving many kids unprotected.

Below is a summary of shots children need:

WSU student planners feature rival school on cover

WSU student planners feature rival school on cover

Students at Washington State University did a double-take when they received their free student planners from The Bookie this week. The cover features a picture of a cougar, the iconic Bryan clock tower and a building that was a little harder to identify.

Down at the very bottom of the cover, with beautiful brick and elegant cherry trees is Savery Hall, a building located at the heart of the campus of WSU's sworn rival – the University of Washington.

Distraught manager Leslie Martin at WSU's bookstore The Bookie says they are aware of the problem and are working with the vendor to come to a solution. The planners are no longer being handed out, but the ones that have been released are not being collected.

There is no word on whether the school will receive a refund or whether a reprint with a corrected cover is in the works. Meanwhile, a photo of the planner is quickly making the rounds online drawing amusement and criticism.