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World Breastfeeding Week in Spokane

World Breastfeeding Week in Spokane

The Spokane Regional Health District announced Thursday that starting tomorrow, August 1, they will celebrate World Breastfeeding Week here in Spokane. The event draws attention to the positive health impacts of breastfeeding for both babies and mothers.

On Saturday, breastfeeding supporters like peer counselors and other staff from the Women, Infant and Children (WIC) nutrition program will participate in the World Breastfeeding Walk and Celebration hosted by the Breastfeeding Coalition of Spokane. Participants should meet at 10:00 am at Riverfront Park's Red Wagon.

Shortly after at 10:25 am, all breastfeeding mothers are welcome to join in the Big Latch On – a simultaneous international breastfeeding event to focus attention on communities' efforts to provide ongoing breastfeeding support.

Riverside State Park wants to make you Happy

Does visiting Riverside State Park make you Happy? That's the theme of a new music video they debuted this week.

Featuring a funky park ranger who isn't afraid to bust a move and hundreds of volunteers dancing to the hit song Happy by Pharell Williams, the video has already been viewed 12-hundred times since it was posted last Friday.

Anyone with a keen eye will also be able to pick out some of their favorite locations in the park, and maybe even a guest appearance by none other than Smokey Bear.

Riverside State Park is a 14,000-acre camping park along the Spokane and Little Spokane rivers. The park supports a wide variety of recreational activities and is rich in history.

Freshwater marshes, running rivers and beautiful countryside make up the terrain. The park also includes the Nine Mile Recreation Area which is available for camping, picnicking, swimming, fishing and boating.

Local agencies partner up for drowning prevention

Local agencies partner up for drowning prevention

The Spokane County Sheriff's Office is teaming up with the Spokane Regional Health District and the Inland Northwest Drowning Prevention Coalition to stress the importance of life jackets and swimming safety measures.

With the holiday weekend approaching, the agencies are partnering to remind residents that preventing drownings is as simple as putting on a life jacket.

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention lists failure to wear a life jacket as among the top reasons people drown, along with lack of swimming lessons, alcohol consumption and lack of supervision.

Half of drowning victims in Washington state did not intend to be immersed in water. Instead, they were fishing near a river or riding in a boat but slipped and fell in cold or swift water.

The partners are working together to boost safety, even offering 25 percent off coupons for a life jacket from Big 5 Sporting Goods which you can find here.

Burn ban on DNR forestland east of Cascades starts July 1

Burn ban on DNR forestland east of Cascades starts July 1

Another warning in the face of the upcoming Fourth of July weekend – the Washington State Department of Natural Resources has placed a burn ban on all DNR-protected land east of the Cascades.

Starting July 1 and running until September 30, the burn ban applies to all forestland under DNR fire protection.

“The seasonally dry weather creates a greater risk for wildfires,” said Commission of Public Lands Peter Goldmark. “A burn ban helps to prevent them and protects forests, habitat and property.”

So far this year DNR has already had 172 wildfire starts, which have burned approximately 779 acres across the state.

The ban applies to all outdoor burning on DNR forestland with two exceptions:

Recreational fires in approved fire pits

Gas or propane stoves and barbecue grills

Fireworks and incendiary devices like exploding targets, sky lanterns or tracer ammunition are also illegal.

Warning for campers at Lake Roosevelt 4th of July weekend

Warning for campers at Lake Roosevelt 4th of July weekend

If you're headed to Lake Roosevelt for the upcoming Fourth of July weekend, the Washington Bureau of Reclamation wants to make sure your campsite stays high and dry.

They're advising people camping along the Lake Roosevelt shoreline to be aware of potential dangers that could exist due to rapidly rising lake levels. The lake is impounded by Grand Coulee Dam on the Columbia River about 90 miles west of Spokane.

“When camping along the shoreline, it is recommended that tents and other belongings be kept well away from the water's edge,” said Public Affairs Officer Lynne Brougher. “Although the lake is a popular vacation spot, it is also a working reservoir that supplies water for hydroelectric facilities at Grand Coulee Dam which can result in rapid fluctuations.”

Brougher says campsites that are too close to the water's edge could potentially become flooded and boats that are not properly anchored or secured could drift out into the lake and become a safety hazard.

Firework sales blast off this weekend

Firework sales blast off this weekend

The Fourth of July is just a week away, and firework sales begin this weekend!

Washington State Fire Marshal Chuck Duffy wants to remind residents to know the local laws before purchasing and discharging fireworks, and to make sure you are only using legal fireworks. This year, 937 licenses were issued for retail firework stands.

A fireworks ban has been in place in the unincorporated areas of Spokane County for 21 years, as well as Spokane, Spokane Valley, Cheney and Liberty Lake.

Fireworks are legal on private property in Airway Heights, Medical Lake and Deer Park.

Bottle rockets, missiles and firecrackers are illegal anywhere in Washington state.

In Coeur d'Alene, non-aerial fireworks are allowed on private property but not in public places like Tubbs Hill or City Park.

If you do find yourself in an area where fireworks are allowed, there are some guidelines you to keep in mind to make sure your family has a safe and fun Fourth.

Riverside State Park ready to open new ORV training facility

Riverside State Park ready to open new ORV training facility

In an effort to reduce accidents Riverside State Park is opening a new beginner-level riding area for off road vehicles at the current ORV park just off Seven Mile Road.

Riverside is the only state park that has an off road vehicle riding facility, and they wanted to make it as safe as possible, for all riders.

The off road training facility, which has been in the works for several years, is the first new addition to Riverside State Park since it opened in the 1980s.

The training facility was two years in development and it took a whole year to construct. Steve May at the ORV training facility said its one of the first in the entire country. The idea originated as a way to minimize accidents on the course.

"Part of the conflict was we had little people mixed in with big bikes and that kind of thing, now we have a special area just for brand new riders," he explained.

The project was funded through ORV tag fees or as May said, it was built by users for users.

Every aspect of the course was built with the beginner in mind, from the path to the smooth ground and wide turns.