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Department of Health asks dog owners to help track ticks through online survey

Department of Health asks dog owners to help track ticks through online survey

 

Washington state health officials are asking dog owners to go online and fill out a short, anonymous survey, and to send the agency any ticks they find during tick season.

 

In Washington, taking the dog for a later winter or spring-time walk comes with the added task of checking four-legged friends for ticks. The tick season has already begun in Western Washington, and in the next few weeks, the Washington State Department of Health says ticks will emerge from their winter hideaways elsewhere in the state.

 

“Many dog owners have found a tick or two on their furry friend after coming home from a walk outside,” said Dr. Liz Dykstra, entomologist for the Department of Health. “We’d like to know more about when and where they’ve picked up ticks, and if their dog has ever been diagnosed with a tick-borne disease.”

 

Spokane County Library District introduces new series of programs aimed at health and wellness

Spokane County Library District introduces new series of programs aimed at health and wellness

 

The Spokane County Library District will present a spring series of programs to provide wellness ideas and practices for everyday living. The theme of the programs is "Nourish", and classes are aimed to act as inspiration to stimulate the participants mind, energize their bodies, and renew their spirits.

 

Programs in the Nourish series are free to attend and will be held at all ten of the District library locations. The line up features exercise classes including yoga and Tai Chi, as well as other programs designed to entice participants to explore the Inland Northwest.

 

Other classes will explore the health benefits of fermented foods or an afternoon cup of tea. In one class, a local chef will share his experience with cooking locally and will also give a cooking demonstration.

 

Program titles:

Free Bloomsday training clinics to be offered by Providence and Group Health beginning March 14

Free Bloomsday training clinics to be offered by Providence and Group Health beginning March 14

 

For those who plan to participate in Bloomsday, but still have some training to do, Providence Health and Services and Group Health are teaming up to offer offer free trailing clinics. These clinics will  provide a medically-sound, gradual conditioning and training programs each Saturday from 8:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. at Spokane Falls Community College beginning March 14th.

 

Whether individuals plan to walk, jog, or run the Bloomsday course, these clinics are tailored to all race participants. Each clinic will feature expert information, a warm-up routine, and a training course especially designed to mazimize each participant's preparation.

 

Training routes will start at one mile, and increase by one mile per week. Medical assistance will also be available during the training, and water stations will be placed along the routes. On site volunteers will be there to assist participants until the last person finishes.

 

Spokane Firefighters say to change smoke alarm batteries along with clocks for Daylight Savings Time

Spokane Firefighters say to change smoke alarm batteries along with clocks for Daylight Savings Time

 

The Spokane Firefighters Union is advising people to take the opportunity to check and change the batteries on their smoke detectors when setting their clocks forward for Daylight Savings Time.

 

According to the Spokane Firefighter's Union, two-thirds of home fire deaths result from fires in homes without a working smoking alarm, according to the National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA). Firefighters from the Spokane Firefighters Union, IAFF Local reminds citizens to not only change their clocks for Daylight Savings Time but the batteries in their smoke alarms, too.
 

“Saving your life can be as simple as changing your smoke alarm batteries once a year and replacing smoke alarms every seven to 10 years,” said IAFF Local 29 President Don Waller.

Washington State Department of Health warns of Salmonella illness tied to baby birds

Washington State Department of Health warns of Salmonella illness tied to baby birds

 

At least 39 Washingtonians have reported getting ill from Salmonella bacteria after coming in contact with live poultry in the past three years, according to reports reviewed by disease investigators at the state’s Department of Health. These 39 cases were associated with three separate national Salmonella outbreaks that caused more than 1,200 people to get sick. Contact with live poultry may also have contributed to more than 100 other cases of salmonellosis in our state in the past three years that weren’t associated with any known outbreak.

 

Spring is the season when many people who have chickens or ducks in backyard flocks buy baby birds. From the time the baby birds arrive at home, children should be supervised carefully to make sure they wash their hands immediately after touching the animals or their environments. Another prevention step is to make sure children don’t snuggle or kiss the young poultry.

 

American Cancer Society offers monthly beauty workshops for women undergoing cancer treatment

American Cancer Society offers monthly beauty workshops for women undergoing cancer treatment

 

Women currently undergoing cancer treatment will have the opportunity to attend the American Cancer Society's next Look Good... Feel Better workshop at Providence Sacred Heart Medical Center and Children's Hospital on Monday, March 9th.

 

Look Good…Feel Better is a free two-hour workshop that is conducted by trained and licensed volunteer beauty professionals who offer practical tips about skin care, makeup techniques, and guidance for coping with hair loss. Participants receive a free bag of makeup matched to their skin tone from leading cosmetic companies valued at about $250. Throughout the workshop, patients are able to talk with other cancer patients going through similar experiences.


 

Local game developers launch crowdfunding campaign for Ebola Attack, an independent game for good

Local game developers launch crowdfunding campaign for Ebola Attack, an independent game for good

Two local developers have launched a crowdfunding campaign to prove games aren't just fun, they also have the power to make a difference in the world.

 

In their game, Ebola Attack, players act as the hero white blood cell that must protect the red cells from a deadly infection: the Ebola virus. Over the course of the game, the human body is healed as gamers progress through increasing levels of difficulty. The player’s goal is to save as many people as possible, meanwhile, all net profits from the purchase of the app will aid the relief effort in the very real Ebola war zone in West Africa.